Please note: Some of the content on this page was published prior to the launch of Creative Australia and references the Australia Council. Read more.

(re)situate Biennale Delegates Program

A funded opportunity for early career individuals working in visual arts. Engage with the Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, Yokohama Triennale, and Venice Biennale 2024.

Biennale Delegates Program 2022, MCA.

About the program

The (re)situate Biennale Delegates Program is a professional development opportunity for early career individuals working in the visual arts industry (producers, technicians, writers, curators, artists, project managers) who are based in Australia or Aotearoa (New Zealand). The program will facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives, and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations.

Between February and April 2024, a total of 15 individuals living in either Australia and Aotearoa (New Zealand), will connect with artists, producers and curators from Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art (face-to-face), Yokohama Triennale (online), and the Venice Biennale (face-to-face).

The (re)situate Program forms part of Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale, extending development and engagement outcomes to the visual arts sector and providing critical exposure to contemporary visual arts practice in an international context. In line with Creative Australia’s International Engagement Strategy 2021-25 the program focusses on Australian practice with a borderless approach to international engagement.


The Biennale Delegates Program is delivered in partnership with Creative New Zealand, Yokohama Triennale and the Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art. It is made possible through co-investment from ArtsACT, Create NSW, Arts NT, Arts Queensland, Arts South Australia, Arts Tasmania and Creative Victoria and the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries – Western Australia. Additional access support for successful applicants has been made possible through the generosity of the Cross Family Foundations.

2024 Biennale Delegates Program Participants

Alice Castello

Annika Aitken

Aspen Beattie (Luritja, Warumungu and Yawuru)

Bahar Sayed

Bilquis Ghani

Eloise Breskvar

Emily Jean Robertson (Palawa)

Georgia Hayward (Mardigan)

Israel Randell (Rarotonga and Tainui, Ngāti Kahungunu)

Jasmine Craciun (Barkindji, Malyangapa)

Linda Iriza

Matariki Williams (Ngāi Tūhoe, Ngāti Hauiti, Taranaki, Ngāti Whakaue, Te Atihaunui-a-Pāpārangi)

Moorina Bonini (Yorta Yorta, Wurundjeri and Wiradjuri)

Peggy Kasabad Lane (Saibai Koedal Awgadhalayg)

Samia Sayed

MATCH Lab

Up to $10,000 in matched funding for independent artists and collectives to run a fundraising campaign, and build fundraising and business skills.

Arts and Disability Initiative 2022-24

This program is for d/Deaf artists or arts workers, or artists or arts workers with disability, seeking to undertake a project or activity to advance their practice, skills or career.

About this initiative

The Australia Council for the Arts is offering six grants of $30,000.

If you are a d/Deaf artist or arts worker, or an artist or arts worker with disability, these grants can provide support for significant projects to extend your arts practice, networks, skills, and ambition.

Your project should be ambitious, bold, and innovative.  It should enhance your career and work, and strengthen your networks.  It must include a clear plan with the steps you will take to achieve your goals. It must also outline the structure and support you will put in place for your development to take your career or practice to the next level.

Supported activities must last no longer than two years from the proposed start date.

This initiative has been developed in response to Australia Council research involving artists and arts workers with disability, our Towards Equity: A research overview of diversity in Australia’s arts and cultural sector  report and a review of the Council’s arts and disability initiatives 2019-2021. This research has informed the Australia Council’s three-year strategic investment in artists with disability 2022-2024.

Meet the 2022 recipients below.


Need help with your application?

Click here to contact Artists Services:

  • with any questions about this initiative
  • to submit an application in a different format, or in a language other than English
  • to arrange a conference call, or to use an Auslan interpreter service
  • if you have any other access or support needs.

 

Easy English

Click here to read in English how to apply.

 

Additional resources

  • Only individuals may apply to this initiative. If you are part of a group, you may apply on behalf of the group.
  • You must identify as a d/Deaf artist or artsworker, or as an artist or arts worker with disability.
  • You must be an Australian citizen or an Australian permanent resident.
  • You may only apply once to this initiative at the 4 July 2023 closing date.

You can’t apply for a grant if:

    • you received a grant from the Australia Council in the past and that grant has not been satisfactorily acquitted
    • you owe money to the Australia Council
    • you are an organisation.

You can apply for:

  • skills development
  • mentoring
  • residencies
  • creation of new work
  • creative development
  • experimentation
  • practice-based research
  • presentation and promotion
  • collaboration

Access costs are legitimate expenses and may be included in your application. We encourage applicants to ensure that their work is accessible to everyone. Therefore, budgets may also include costs associated with making activities accessible to a wide range of people (e.g. performances using Auslan, translation to other languages, captioning, audio description, temporary building adjustments, and materials in other formats).

You may apply for access costs associated with the use of an interpreter, translation services, specific technical equipment, carer, or support worker assistance. Please contact Artists Services to discuss your needs.

You can’t apply for projects or activities that:

  • do not involve or benefit practicing artists or arts workers
  • do not have a clearly defined arts component
  • have already taken place.

Applications to this initiative will be assessed by peers from the arts sector.  Most of the assessors will identify as d/Deaf or disabled.

For more information see: How we assess applications.

All applicants will be advised of the outcome of their application within 12 weeks of the closing date.

You must address three assessment criteria in this initiative.

Under each criterion are bullet points indicating what the peer assessors may consider when reviewing your application. You do not need to respond to every bullet point.

Peers will assess the quality of your proposal. They may consider:

  • the quality of the proposed activity
  • the quality of your previous work
  • public or peer responses to your work
  • the quality of your collaborators or partners
  • how your proposed activity is ambitious, bold, innovative and career-enhancing.

Peers will assess the viability of your proposal. They may consider:

  • realistic and achievable planning and resource use, with a clear plan and steps to achieve your goals
  • evidence of structure and support in place for your development
  • the relevance and timeliness of the proposed activity
  • the skills and roles of partners or collaborators, including confirmation of involvement
  • where relevant to your proposal, evidence that the Protocols for using First Nations Cultural and Intellectual Property in the Arts have been adhered to
  • appropriate payments to participating artists, arts workers, collaborators, participants, or cultural consultants
  • evidence of appropriate consultation with participants, audiences, or communities
  • the safety and wellbeing of people involved in the project, and public safety in relation to presentations or travel
  • how you have addressed access in the proposed activity
  • where relevant, evidence that you have addressed the environmental impact of your project.

Peers will assess the impact that your proposal will have on your practice and career. They may consider:

  • how your activity will extend your arts practice, networks, skills, and ambition
  • how your activity will extend the arts practice, networks, skills, and ambition of other artists and arts workers involved.

Instructions and a link to the online application form are available here.

The application form will ask you to provide:

  • a title for your activity
  • a summary of your activity
  • a brief bio of the artist or arts worker applying
  • a detailed description of your activity
  • a timetable or itinerary for your activity
  • an outline of how your activity will extend arts practice, networks, skills, and ambition
  • details of the expenses, income and in-kind support for your activity, including any access and support costs
  • supporting material relevant to your activity. This may include examples of your previous work, bios of additional people involved, and letters of support from participants or communities.

All Australia Council grants information including guidelines and application forms are available in accessible formats upon request.

These formats include word documents, audio CD, Braille, Easy English, Auslan and large print. Please note that requests for translated materials will need to allow for a six-week turnaround.

We accept applications for all our programs in accessible formats.

Formats include Auslan, audio, video, printed, dictated, electronic and handwritten formats. Contact Artists Services to discuss your requirements.

You should submit support material with your application. The peer assessors may review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your project.

What you should provide

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post unless you have contacted us in advance to discuss your access needs. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online, or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact Artists Services.

There are three types of support material you may submit:

1. Artistic support material

This should include relevant, recent examples of your artistic or cultural work.

2. Biographies and CVs

You can include a brief bio or curriculum vitae (CV) for key artists, personnel or other collaborators involved in your project.

Brief bios or CV information should be presented as a single document no longer than two A4 pages in total.

3. Letters of support

Individuals, groups, or organisations can write letters in support of your project. A support letter should explain how the project or activity will benefit you, other artists or arts professionals, participants, or the broader community. It can also detail the support or involvement of key project partners, or evidence of consultation.

If relevant to your activity, letters of support must provide evidence of appropriate permissions and support from First Nations organisations, communities, and Elders. Please refer to the First Nations Protocols for more information.

You can include up to five letters of support, with each letter not exceeding one A4 page.

Types of support material we accept

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs (weblinks).

You can provide up to three URLs (weblinks) that link to content that is relevant to your proposal. This may include video, audio, images, or written material.

These URLs can include a total of:

  • 10 minutes of video and/or audio recording
  • 10 images
  • 10 pages of written material (for example, excerpts of literary writing).

Please note: Our peer assessors will not access any URLs that require them to log in or sign up to a platform. Please do not provide links to Spotify or other applications that require users to log in or pay for access.

If you are linking to media files that are private or password protected like Vimeo, please provide the password in the password field on the application form.

Other accepted file formats

If you cannot supply support material via URLs, you may upload support material to your application in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  • written material (Word and PDF).

Details of the grant recipients will be published on the Australia Council website. These details will include the name of each recipient, their resident state or territory, the amount awarded, the panel which assessed the application (Arts & Disability panel) and the name of the round (the Arts and Disability Initiative).

Please contact Artists Services if you do not wish to have your name published.

Cara-Ann Simpson is an artist, curator, cultural heritage expert and consultant, with a background as an executive director, property manager, conservation manager, and educator. She is a multidisciplinary artist with a focus on sensory engagement, digital technologies, space and the participant. Cara-Ann is engaged with cultural heritage, landscape, sensoria and how people interact with their environment. 

In 2017, Cara-Ann became extremely ill, spending close to a year in hospital with an extreme brain infection, eventually being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis and Neurosarcoidosis. She spent a number of months in rehabilitation learning how to walk again and become stronger. During this period picking flowers and going for short walks outside became a lifeline to regaining optimism for the future and finding her way back to creating art. She currently lives with her partner Michael, and their two dogs – Sebastian and Eddie – on the lands of the Jarowair people of the Wakka Wakka nation on a farm in Queensland.

My multi-disciplinary art practice explores Critical Disability Aesthetics. As a woman with dwarfism, I work collaboratively to experiment with the representation of my embodied difference. The focus of my art to date, has been upon features and dynamics of interactions and relations within physical and social environments that define the dwarf person as an Other. By experimenting with the power of the gaze and changing point of view, I emphasise the politics of visible difference. Employing the mediums of performance, video, VR, photography, and sculpture, my oeuvre has evolved to culminate in cross art-form works. I explore the capacities of each medium to communicate a different and dynamic perspective of lived experience.

My approach to Critical Disability Aesthetics experiments with shifting point of view to engage with and immerse participants and audiences into my world. I constantly challenge traditional stereotypes about those who look different, and to date, the subject of my work in this endeavour is my lived experience. As my art practice evolves, I aim to move beyond the perspective of the individual. My current works explore the experiences of those who share my body type from the four corners of the world, different gender identities, ages, strata of society and those at intersections of disadvantage. Experimenting further with cross art-forms – visual and auditory – I aim to produce work that invites audiences to engage with these different perspectives and points of view to gain new insight and understanding of what it is like to be “a different kind of different”.

As an artist and academic my experimental approach to Critical Disability Aesthetics has been exhibited in both National and State galleries and festivals, published in chapters, discussed in interviews, presented at conferences and workshops.

I am a lecturer at Western Sydney University in Humanitarian and Development Studies, and my first PhD was in Psychology on the subject of Dehumanization. Currently studying for my second PhD in Visual Arts at Art & Design UNSW, my research focuses upon developing a Critical Disability Aesthetic through the representation of the female dwarf.

My practice is primarily focused on projects that involve story-telling at their core and reveal unique perspectives. First beginning in the screen industry, I am quite organically moving into theatre and performance-making. In 2020 Back to Back Theatre invited me to work as an associate producer for five months in the lead up to their first feature film Shadow. The film was created in collaboration with an ensemble of actors with perceived intellectual disabilities. Intertwined with the making of the film was an ambitious internship program, which I helped set up and run. The program supported 30 artists identifying as having a disability to work as paid interns across all departments. Back to Back have since employed me as a Guest Artist and Research Consultant, and have asked me to represent the company and film in Athens, New York City and Norway.

This project will develop a new work, INFLUENCE, exploring the effects of social media and publicity on our daily life and interactions with others. I will develop the new work alongside my professional skills in three phases:
1: Month-long Professional Development Residency with Back to Back Theatre;
2: Artistic Research Residency with Mammalian Diving Reflex;
3: Final writing phase, with mentorship by Rhian Hinkley.

I am a 35 year old comedian, writer and aspiring screenwriter living with cerebral palsy. I made my comedy debut in 2020 and from there have seen my career go from strength to strength taking out joint first place in the National Final of the Raw Comedy Competition at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival in 2022. Later that year I was invited to take part in a writers room for Wil Anderson’s ABC panel show Question Everything (produced by CJZ). I have had an incredible 2023 so far being invited to give a TEDX talk (2022) as part of their TEDX Byron Bay Women programme where I shared my experience of owning my sexuality as a woman living with disability.

This funding will support a live show & creative screenwriting development, promotion and accessibility project.

Dr Bon Mott is a transdisciplinary artist, curator, and educator based in Naarm (Melbourne). Their artistic practice revolves around site-specific process-driven sculpture installations incorporating performance art, drawing inspiration from Indigenous and Western European science of lightning.

The project supports R&D into the science of lightning to create and document process-driven installations and activations. This is a one-year transdisciplinary research-based project with an outcome of mixed-media ceiling installations and activations. Through the intersection of art and personal experience, the project focus is the science of lightning informed by my nonbinary identity and neurological disability. The project involves research and development in the studio, on the ancient lands of Australia and building upon existing relationships of trust and collaboration with artists and arts workers, fostering a fast response and creating a diverse network of collaborators through mentorship from First Nations creatives and lightning and cosmic ray scientists in and Turtle Island (USA) to expand my networks while creating innovative artworks that explore themes of identity, science, and social change.

A killer Music Director, MC, Composer, Sound Designer, DJ, Music Dramaturg and Performance Maker, Kim ‘Busty Beatz’ Bowers has been making fearless art to activate, pollinate and liberate for over 30 years. Of Xhosa heritage and living on Yuggera country, she creates sonic experiences intersecting disciplines, politics and soundlines with a focus on giving voice to stories which are unseen and unheard.

This project supports Bowers to research and develop ‘Confessions of the Brutally Blessed – A Survival Handbook’ giving voice to the untold story of Legacy, Medicine, and Revolution. By developing a series of electrifying performances, theatrical captures and sonic collaborations, this new work is a journey of love, loss, death and joy as Busty Beatz confronts her past, present, and future after being diagnosed with Breast Cancer, undertaking chemotherapy and a left breast mastectomy. With themes of body sovereignty, historical pathologising of Black Female Body throughout medical history and finding joy, ‘Confessions of the Brutally Blessed’ is an honest and unflinching exploration of what it means to be an artist living in the space known as the in-between.

Luke is a director, movement, and multi-disciplinary artist. Luke is also an artist living with Down Syndrome and he is not happy about it. He longs to be seen and critiqued as an artist – not as an artist living with a disability. In III he is putting his art to the test through anonymity, abstraction and distance.

III is a trilogy of cross art form investigations directed by Luke John Campbell. In the winter of 2025 The CHAIN [2021], The BRIDGE [2022] and the BOND [2023-24] will be presented in a fully immersive experience at Plimsoll Gallery at the University of Tasmania School of the Arts Hobart Campus. Through the use of performance, installation, motion capture, audio and video manipulations, III confronts reality, space, time and the ties between place and people. The work explores the conceptual space between who we think we see and our expectations of them; Where we think we are and where we belong. Viewers are invited to question what and who they are seeing and consider whether they judge a book by its cover.

I’m a Deaf multi-disciplinary artist living and working in Victoria. I work with performance art, dance performance, sculpture, textile, poetry and Auslan poetry, drawing and painting. I recently completed my Masters of Contemporary Art at VCA at Melbourne Uni. I moved towards multi-disciplinary practices in 2019, delving into my Deaf history and experiences to realise there was a lot of unresolved issues with the Deaf community around oppression, audism, and displacement and my personal experiences as a Deaf person.

This project involves developing a large scale works on paper through a printmaking residency informing my perspectives. My project will focus on informing my personal perspectives and experiences using my drawing, painting and printmaking practice, including textile elements on a large-scale watercolour paper around 3-4 m long and 1 m high. I will be exploring and unpacking my identity and issues with housing using houses and buildings as stories on paper. I will be in residency using the printmaking facilities at Baldessin Press in St Andrews, Melbourne to develop further my printmaking skills under the mentor support of Silvi Glattauer and to create the new work at Baldessin in July 2024.

I am a disabled artist practicing opera in Sydney. As a part of my performance practice, I have recently finished a Bachelor’s Degree on full scholarship and with first class honours at the Sydney Conservatorium. I have also recently completed a Diploma of Language Studies at the University of Sydney. I have several performances lined up, including Mrs Grose in Britten’s ‘The Turn of the Screw’, and Donna Elvira in Mozart’s ‘Don Giovanni’. I am also undertaking private study with teachers from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music in the interim between my bachelor’s and master’s degree.

I am planning to undertake a Masters of Arts (Vocal Performance) commencing in September this year at the Royal Academy of Music, London, with a partial scholarship. I will be working with some of the most esteemed pedagogues and professionals from the international opera community in order to continue to further foster my development as a young opera singer. I will be working closely with international mezzo-soprano Catherine Wyn-Rogers as my teacher, as well as a number of other professionals including Yvonne Kenny AM for the study of Mozart and Handel arias and Kate Paterson as the head of vocal studies. The program will run for two years, and will lead me to further opera study or work.

My artistic journey spans over a decade and includes significant international recognition in contemporary dance. I’ve had the privilege of working with renowned dance creators including Akram Khan, Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, Russell Maliphant, Hans van den Broeck, Damien Jalet, and Hofesh Shechter. My drive is to create and present surprisingly real dance works to diverse audiences, with a “local focus, global outlook” ethos. I run a project-based dance company – the only disability and First Nations-led arts organisation in the country, from our home base in regional SA.

This project is a 12-month mentorship with acclaimed artistic director and choreographer, Russell Maliphant OBE. It involves a comprehensive development of artistic skills, leadership capabilities, and capacity building for international arts leaders. Activities include structured professional development sessions, individual project creation, and guidance in operating a 21st-century dance company. The mentorship includes a blend of physical and virtual interaction, with periods spent in the UK and Australia. The outcome is a new choreographed work, international repertoire of a global standard performed by Australian artists with a disability with performance outcomes, and refined operational strategies for my dance company, contributing to the global dance arts landscape.

Frequently Asked Questions

The initiative is designed to support a wide variety of arts project or career development activities, including the creation of new work, career development, mentoring, residencies, research and development presentation and promotion.

Supported activities must last no longer than two years from the proposed start date.

The Australia Council expects that all artists and arts workers employed or engaged on Australia Council-funded activities will be remunerated for their work. Peers assessing applications for the Arts and Disability Initiative will consider remuneration when they look at the viability of your activity. You should make provision in your budget for appropriate payment of artists and arts workers. For more information, refer to the Australia Council policy on the payment of artists.

Artists and arts workers with disability face barriers in formal arts education and training. They have very diverse professional and career development parthways which need to be tailored to individual requirements and circumstances. Show how your project will have a positive effect on your practice and career, externing your arts practice, networks, skills and ambition of you and your collaborators. You can consider mentoring as an option (see below), or any of the following activities:

  • formal or informal training
  • feedback, critical reflection or peer review from your collaborators
  • work placements, internships or learning and development activities with an industry or organisational partner
  • structured learning and development activities with your collaborators, including peer-to-peer learning
  • workshops or time spent with Elders, senior artists or community leaders
  • documentation of your learning and development.

Mentoring is any supportive relationship that encourages the sharing of knowledge, skills and experience. Mentoring can be structured or informal and can include peer-to-peer mentoring.  Peer-to-peer mentoring assumes an even playing field and exchange of knowledge in the relationship, where everyone involved contributes and learns from different perspectives and experience. For the purposes of this initiative, mentoring is interpreted very broadly and is informed by the needs and priorities of the applicant. The Australia Council for the Arts Guide to Mentoring is a useful reference.

Australia Council staff are available to assist you in understanding the purpose of the grant, application requirements, and submitting your application. Staff can assist over email, phone, Teams, Zoom, and, where possible, in person.

We do not review draft applications. However, we can discuss any specific questions or issues you have about your application.

If you need help writing your application, we encourage you to contact one of the arts and disability peak bodies. A list of those peak bodies, along with further accessibility resources, is here.

Yes. We encourage you to submit your application using our online system. You can submit your application in any way that is accessible to you. Other formats include Auslan, audio, video, printed, dictated, electronic and handwritten format.

Contact the Artists Services team to discuss your needs well in advance of the closing date.

Applications to the Arts and Disability Initiative will be assessed by artists and arts worker across art forms and across states and territories. Most of the assessors will identify as d/Deaf or disabled.

No. You will be asked whether or not you identify as d/Deaf or a person with disability.

The information you choose to share about yourself in your application is entirely up to you. When outlining your project and your professional development activity, some applicants may choose to share information about their lived experience and how this informs their practice, access requirements, or needs and plans for professional development. There is no obligation to disclose anything other than information you feel comfortable sharing to enable the panel to assess your application.

If you are successful in receiving this funding, you will have the option of not publishing your name as a recipient of the Arts and Disability Initiative. Please advise Artists Services if you do not want to be publicly identified.

The initiative is not designed to provide indirect funding to organisations. Applications are only open to individuals and groups. Contact Artists Services if you are unsure.

Yes, but note that the initiative is not designed to provide indirect funding to organisations. Your proposal must demonstrate that the artist or arts worker with disability will have creative control of the project. Contact Artists Services to discuss your application if you are unsure.

If you are unable to complete the application form, a support worker or other person helping you with the application can sign on your behalf.

Digital Specialist-in-Residence

This program provides arts organisations with access to a specialist to help them develop their digital capacity and pilot a new digitally led project.

Danny Brookes, Cityguide.

Online Information Sessions

Watch our regionally-focused online Information Session to find out more about the program and how it can help your organisation.

Focus on Western Australia

Watch here or below.

Focus on regional, remote and Tasmania

Watch here or below.


 

About the program

This program evolves and replaces the Digital Strategist-in-Residence initiative, embedding learnings from our program evaluations over the last two years to incorporate new elements and include an additional piloting phase.

The Digital Specialist-in-Residence program provides arts organisations with access to a specialist who will help them develop their digital capacity and pilot a new digitally led project. The program also provides $3000 seed funding to assist in prototyping or piloting your digitally led project (granted after a successful pitch of your project).

Over a period of fourteen weeks, the specialist will work with your organisation to:

  • review your current digital capabilities
  • identify areas for digital improvement
  • interview and engage with key internal stakeholders
  • explore new opportunities to expand digital activities
  • develop a digital project tailored to the values, people and context of your organisation
  • pilot program and evaluate learnings

 

The program is delivered in four phases. Your organisation will work with the specialist to complete the following:

  1. Assess: the specialist will guide you through a process to identify the organisation’s current level of digital maturity.
  2. Ideate: a process of ideation and investigation to identify digital challenges and opportunities for your organisation.
  3. Develop: Develop your flagship project, model program or prototype product.
  4. Pilot & Refine: Launch project, evaluate early learnings, present findings.

The Digital Specialist-in-Residence will connect and collaborate with key members of your team. The program will involve facilitated sessions and self-directed tasks.

There is a one week pre-program period of onboarding and program orientation, after which the specialist will be available for one day a week over fourteen weeks. There is a small seed grant for each organisation to go towards piloting their project.

Each organisation must nominate a minimum of two team members (one in a leadership position) who will work closely with the digital specialist over the fourteen weeks, and continue the work on completion of the residency.

The commitment of both time and staff members to lead on this work is essential to make the residency a success.  Organisations should ensure their digital champions can dedicate one day each week for the length of the program.

There will also be five compulsory online sessions with the cohort of participating organisations to provide an opportunity to connect and share experiences and knowledge and hear from industry experts.

This program provides $3000 seed funding to assist in prototyping or piloting your digitally led project (granted after a successful pitch of your project). Your Digital Specialist will provide support in ideating your digitally led project.

You will be required to complete an acquittal report at the conclusion of the program.

The Digital Specialist-in-Residence program is open to Australian arts organisations.

The program invites a diverse range of organisations to apply, and the opportunity is open to applicants from any:

  • art form or area of practice
  • scale or size of organisation
  • location in Australia, however organisations in regional or remote locations are particularly encouraged to apply
  • main activity, including performing, producing, service or collecting
  • existing level of digital readiness or capability.

Your organisation will be matched with an appropriate specialist from our group of creative technologists based on your needs and opportunities.

You are eligible to apply whether or not your organisation currently receives funding from the Creative Australia.

Please note this program requires a commitment of eight hours a week over the fourteen-week period.

Applicants who submitted in an earlier round are invited to apply again.

Organisations who have participated in the Digital Strategist-in-Residence program are ineligible.  

This program has identified positions for two First Nations organisations.

Please read our FAQs before commencing your application.

Applications will be reviewed by staff and industry advisors. Your application will be based on merit, response to the selection criteria below, and in line with Creative Australia’s commitment to diversity and inclusion. 

Selection Criteria:

  • timeliness and relevance of the program to your organisation
  • drive and motivation of team members to collaborate and experiment with diverse ways of learning and innovation
  • commitment to exploring and implementing digital solutions for the arts sector.
  • Shortlisted applicants may be invited for an interview following submission of an application.

Shortlisted applicants may be invited for an interview following submission of an application.

Read about how your application will be assessed here.

Creative Australia encourages applications from people who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability and people living in regional and remote areas.

We actively work with individuals to support access needs – including childcare, cultural practices, financial and/or learning access needs as required. We encourage applicants to contact us via phone or email to discuss this further. 

Additional information

Once you submit your application, we will send you an email acknowledging receipt of your application.

After you submit your application, we first check it meets the eligibility criteria for the grant or opportunity to which you are applying.

You will be notified of the outcome of your application in early January 2024.

For FAQs relating to the grants model, please click here.

Please contact the Artists Services team.

Once all applications have been assessed, you will be contacted about the outcome of your application. If you have been successful, you will also be sent an agreement.

Frequently asked questions

Phase 1: Program onboarding and introduction

  • Introduction to your Digital Specialist
  • Providing your specialist with information about your organisation
  • Introduction to program and program materials

Program Overview’ Cohort workshop (120 minutes online, date TBC)

 

Phase 2: Assess

Your specialist will guide you through a process to identify the organisation’s current digital capacity.

‘Ideate’ Cohort workshop (120 minutes online, date TBC)

 

Phase 3: Ideate

A process of ideation and investigation to identify digital challenges and opportunities for your organisation. This will include workshops with internal and external stakeholders.

‘How to Pitch’ Cohort workshop (120 minutes online, date TBC)

 

Phase 4: Develop

Identify, test and develop your flagship project, model program or prototype product. Seed funding is released. ‘Organisations Pitch Projects’ Cohort workshop (120 minutes online, date TBC)

 

Phase 5: Pilot & Refine  

Launch project, evaluate early learnings, present findings. Put in place tracking and evaluation frameworks. 

‘Organisations Present Learnings’ Cohort workshop (120 minutes online, date TBC)  

Our digital specialists are a diverse group of creative technologists and digital consultants with a broad range of experience across digital technologies, capacities and roles. Specialists will be located across Australia and are selected based on their:

  • knowledge of the arts and creative industry
  • experience with digital transformation
  • commitment to digital inclusion, cultural competency and accessibility.

Organisations will be matched with specialists based on the individual needs and priority areas.

The Digital Specialist will be available for one day each week across the fourteen-week residency. This will include some mutual contact hours each week (as well as the Specialist’s research and planning time for your organisation).

There will be a combination of contact and non-contact hours with your organisation for between two to four team members. Other team members should also be invited to discrete activities and kept informed by the organisation as to the project progress and timing.

There will also be five compulsory online sessions with the cohort of participating organisations to provide an opportunity to connect and share experiences and knowledge and hear from industry experts.

This residency is designed to be delivered online with potential for hybrid delivery, involving a combination of in-person and online sessions with your specialist via negotiation.

Individuals can apply via our online application system. If you have access requirements, please get in touch so we can assist you.

  • timeliness and relevance of the program to your organisation
  • drive and motivation of team members to collaborate and experiment with diverse ways of learning and innovation
  • commitment to exploring and implementing digital solutions for the arts sector.
  • Please respond to the selection criteria.
  • Introduce your organisation and why you do what you do.
  • How has your organisation explored digital so far?
  • What are some digital projects you would like to explore during the residence?
  • How has your organisation explored and managed digital so far?
  • What does digital leadership in the sector look like to you?
  • What tools and processes do you have in place to facilitate collaboration between your team members?
  • Please list your organisation’s two Digital Champions, who would participate in the program, if successful.

This opportunity is open to organisations.

An ‘organisation’ is a legally constituted organisation that is registered or created by law. For example, incorporated associations, companies limited by guarantee or government statutory authorities are all defined as organisations.

Your application will be assessed as per the selection criteria. The program is designed to bring together a diverse range of applicants from organisations around the country and we work to ensure a balance between geographic locations and artforms. This will be considered in the assessment process.

The program requires you to identify a minimum of two Digital Champions (one in a leadership position) from your organisation to lead the residency. Consider staff who have the ability to lead your team and enact the recommendations or opportunities that may arise. It is important to get buy-in across your organisation, so consider representatives from different teams.

This program provides $3000 seed funding to assist in prototyping or piloting your digitally led project. These funds will be granted after a successful pitch of your project, during the course of the program. Successful applicants will be given detailed instructions on this process.

The application form asks: “What are some digital projects you would like to explore during the residence?” If successful, your Digital Specialist will provide support in ideating your digitally led project, so suggested ideas are sufficient for the application.

You do not need to supply a budget with your application.

You will be required to complete an acquittal report at the conclusion of the program.

Please send an email to digital@creative.gov.au if you would like to discuss your eligibility or application.

Digital Transformation for the Creative Industries

A six-week, online short course providing insight into digital strategy and new technologies.

Image: tuylupaby pakana kanaplila and Soma Lumia. Presented by Tasdance and Mona Foma, in collaboration with Theatre Royal. Credit: Jillian Mundy

About the program

Digital Transformation for the Creative Industries is an online short course designed specifically for artists and arts and creative workers it is best suited for those with a beginner or intermediate understanding of the digital space as it relates to the creative industries.

Developed and delivered in collaboration with the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), this six-week course will give you an insight into key digital concepts, modes of digital practice, emergent technologies and also introduce ideas around digital strategy and business model innovation.

As a leading Australian university and a top-ranked university in Australia, UTS is home to industry-connected educators and researchers who are leaders in their creative fields, and passionate about organisational and individual skills development and uplift.

Curated by arts and cultural practitioners, Digital Transformation for the Creative Industries is specifically designed for artists and creative practitioners, arts administrators, managers, and directors working, whether independent, or from organisations large or small who want to begin to understand digital practice and strategy.

You will join a cohort of industry peers and colleagues working in different artforms across Australia to understand, explore and shape your thinking around digital. Key topics include:

  • Understanding key digital concepts
  • Digital practices for the arts
  • Digital transformation strategy
  • Digital leadership
  • Digital business models
  • Demystifying emerging technologies.

This six-week course requires a commitment of up to four hours a week, and is a combination of facilitated sessions, online group learning and self-directed activities that can be directly applied to your existing work and practice.

In collaboration with:

This course is for artists and creative practitioners, arts administrators, managers, and directors working in organisations or independently in the arts and creative industry. Participants will work in a range of artforms around Australia.

  • Participants must be over 18 years of age.
  • Participants must be based within Australia to partake in the first round. Positions will be open to international artists and arts workers from the second round onwards.

The Australia Council encourages applications from people who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability and people living in regional and remote areas.

This course is digitally accessible and follows the AAA standards. Please get in touch if you have any specific access requirements.

Applications for subsidised positions in the first three cohorts closed on Tuesday 2 August.

Applications for subsidised positions in the first three cohorts closed on  Tuesday 7 February, 3pm (AEST).

The course will run for six weeks, beginning with an introductory session the week prior to commencement. Five cohorts of participants will be accepted in the March – June 2023 sessions:

  • 13 March – 21 April 2023
  • 8 May – 16 June 2023

Positions in the first three rounds of the Digital Transformation for the Creative Industries course are subsidised as part of the Digital Culture Program.

Tiered subsidies are available to support access for a diversity of participants:

  • Independent artists/practitioner – A $600 subsidy is available. Participants will be required to pay $75
  • Small to medium arts organisations – $300 subsidy available for representatives from. Participants will be required to pay $375
  • Large organisations/institutions – The overall course fee of $675 (ex GST) applies

If your subsidy application is unsuccessful, you can choose to pay the course fee in full. The overall course fee is $675 (ex GST).

Subsidised positions are limited. Subsidy applications will be assessed to ensure an equitable spread of participants across artform, location and priority areas.

If your application is successful, we will contact you with payment and onboarding information.

Frequently asked questions

This course is designed to support arts and creative practitioners to embrace a digital mindset and to enable digital innovation within the sector.

The course is delivered in partnership with University of Technology Sydney (UTS) and will draw on expert knowledge and experience to build the digital literacy and capacity of the creative industries.

Through the ‘Digital Transformation for Creative Industries’ course, participants will:

  • Gain the knowledge and ability to assess the digital strengths and priorities of their practice or organisation.
  • Identify and implement digital practices, workflows and platforms to gain efficiencies and digital workflows.
  • Be able to develop, mobilise and implement a relevant and customised organisation-wide digital strategy.
  • Be able to apply adaptive architecture principles to enable digital innovation and transformation.

The course will be facilitated by leading creatives and academics from the UTS team, with a range of guest speakers and facilitators from across artforms and across Australia.

This course is for artists and creative practitioners, arts administrators, managers, and directors working in organisations or independently in the arts and creative industry. Participants will work in a range of artforms around Australia.

best suited for those with a beginner or intermediate understanding of the digital space as it relates to the creative industries. There is not a requirement for an existing high-level of technological skills or understanding to undertake the course. The course will focus on digital mindsets, literacy and strategic development.

The course is six weeks and requires up to four hours of your time each week.

The course includes self-directed reading, activities and online content as well as one hour of group learning and discussion with a facilitator every week.

The course is delivered on UTS online learning platform Canvas. Details of how to access, use and navigate the platform will be provided on enrolment.

For any questions or further information about the Digital Culture Program please email digitalarts@creative.gov.au or call 02 9215 9036.

ProtoX Arts Digital Accelerator Program

A 12-week mentoring program for artists, groups and organisations to develop new digital business ideas.

 
Register for our information session on Wednesday 25 January, 12.30-1.30pm AEDT.
 


 

About the opportunity

Australia Council for the Arts is collaborating with INCUBATE, the University of Sydney’s Flagship Startup Program, to deliver ProtoX Arts – a national 12-week Digital Accelerator Program for individual artists, groups and arts organisations. Through 1:1 mentoring, industry connections and weekly goal-setting, ProtoX Arts provides the subject matter expertise to empower members of the arts community to pursue their digitally centred ideas into businesses.

This program supports emerging creative founders and the broader ecosystem by teaching key foundational business frameworks and enabling connections into the startup community. Additionally, hands-on customer testing, prototyping, and iterating are encouraged to build founders and businesses that service the arts and creative sectors.

Taking part in this Accelerator Program will equip you with the knowledge, skills and confidence to pursue your startup idea.

This program is designed to support digitally centred business and product ideas such as plug-ins, media players, immersive VR/AR experiences, apps, platforms and programs, that originated out of, or support the creative industries.

Image credit: Amrita Hepi, Open Poses (detail), 2022. Installation view, Primavera 2022: YoungAustralian Artists, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney, 2022. Datasetfor pose recognition, custom software, webcam, monitors, decal, lamps, paintedwall, sound. Image courtesy the artist and Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, ©the artist. Photograph: Anna Kučera

This opportunity is open for arts-aligned/creative industries organisations and individuals.

Applications will be reviewed by staff and industry advisors. Your application will be based on merit, response to the selection criteria below, and in line with Australia Council’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

  1. Timeliness and relevance of the training opportunity to your professional development
  2. The impact the proposed activity will have on your career
  3. Viability of the proposed project

You will be asked to provide your biography and most up to date CV.

Frequently asked questions

To apply, you will need to answer the following questions:

  • What problem are you solving and why is it worth solving?
  • Can you share a time in your career (either as a freelancer or an employee) where you experienced this (or a similar) problem and how you fixed this problem?
  • Why do you think now is the time to test this idea? Do you have a unique insight into the market?

A problem can be a time-consuming task, a breakdown in process or an expensive way of doing something simple. If you’ve ever thought “there has to be a simpler or better way” you’ve identified a problem.

This residency is designed to be delivered online. Over 12 weekly 2 hour sessions, (Wednesday 5pm-7pm) and with access to 2 additional hours per week to work with mentors and Entrepreneurs-in-Residence.

This program is for arts-aligned/creative industries individuals and organisations who have an idea for a digital product, have found a solution to a problem or see a gap in the market that they can fill. Product ideas may include as plug-ins, media players, immersive VR/AR experiences, apps, platforms and programs, that originated out of, or support the creative industries.

Not all participants in the program may end up taking their product to market after exploring the viability of the project through the program, however all participants will leave the program with new skills in product development, entrepreneurship and business, which they can take to their next project.

This program will be delivered online.

Please email digital@creative.gov.au if you would like more information.

Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week

5-7 October 2022

About this opportunity

The Australia Council is pleased to announce the Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week.

The Digital Skills Program is a series of workshops, seminars and intensives that focus on using digital and emerging technologies to develop creative practice.

As part of this program we’re offering 6 artists and digital practitioners the chance to experience a selection of the Melbourne International Games week program over three days. The program includes flights to Melbourne, 2 nights accommodation, a per diem and tickets to industry events.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space or related fields and would like to expand their knowledge of the gaming sector and technologies.

Read more about Melbourne International Games Week here.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space including but not limited to animators, story board artists, illustrators, composers and sound designers.

Applications will be reviewed by staff and industry advisors. Your application will be based on merit, response to the selection criteria below, and in line with Australia Council’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

You will need to answer the following questions:

  • Tell us about your creative practice and how you work with digital technologies?
  • Why is this opportunity right for you at this time?
  • Are you available on the 5-7 of October?

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button, or on this link.

Please indicate on the application form if you have any accessibility requirements.

Venice Biennale 2024: expressions of interest for artistic proposals

Opportunity for Australian artists and curators to present a ground-breaking and ambitious exhibition within the Australia Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2024.

Australia Pavilion.

Watch the recording of the information session

In this webinar held on Monday, 26 September, we provided an overview of the stage one process.

About the opportunity

Expressions of interest (EOI) are now open for artistic proposals to represent Australia in the category of National Participation for the 60th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia (Venice Biennale 2024).

The Venice Biennale is a significant platform that allows Australian contemporary art to be known globally for its innovation, sustainability, complexity, and diversity. Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale provides Australian artists and curators with a high-profile international opportunity that includes important international exposure to new audiences, markets, and contexts. This exposure builds the profile of Australian contemporary art and stimulates international cultural links, networks and dialogue for Australian artists and curators.

Australia Council for the Arts is the commissioner in the category of National Participation for the Venice Biennale. In 2024 the Council will be the producing manager of the exhibition. The successful artistic team will work in close collaboration with the Australia Council from concept through to the development, launch and deinstallation.

The Venice Biennale typically runs for seven months, from May to November 2024.

Shortlisted applicants from the expressions of interest will be invited to submit a detailed proposal later this year (Stage Two). The successful artistic team will be announced in early 2023.

We are looking for an artistic team with the concept, credentials, and experience to exhibit in the Australia Pavilion for the Venice Biennale 2024.

A shortlisted proposal will include an artistic concept that is:

  • creatively ambitious
  • engaged with contemporary visual art discourse and global conversations
  • responsive to the architecture of the Australia Pavilion, and
  • considerate of the audiences who visit the Venice Biennale.

Proposals may focus on presenting one artist or relate to a number of artists and their practice. Similarly, proposals may include one curator or a number of curators.

Artist Fellowship

The artist/s representing Australia in the Pavilion will receive the Venice Artist Fellowship of $100,000 to develop, create, and produce new artwork(s) for the exhibition in the Australia Pavilion. Additional support towards travel and accommodation in Venice will be provided.

Curator Fellowship

The curator/s representing Australia will receive the Venice Curator Fellowship of $50,000 to provide curatorial direction for the exhibition, working closely with the Australia Council as the producer. Additional support towards travel and accommodation in Venice will be provided.

General Support

An exhibition budget covering freight and equipment, fabrication, Pavilion operations and maintenance, install and deinstall, PR and marketing will be managed by the Australia Council as the producer.

Only individuals and groups may apply to this opportunity. All members of the artistic team must be Australian citizens or Australian permanent residents and practicing artists or arts professionals.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this opportunity if:

  • you have already applied to this opportunity in a separate proposal
  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • you are an organisation.

Your EOI must address three assessment criteria.

First Criterion | Quality

The panel will assess the quality of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • vision, ideas, and artistic rationale
  • level of innovation, ambition, experimentation or risk-taking.

Second Criterion | Viability

The panel will assess the viability of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • skills and ability of artist/s and curator/s involved, and relevance to the proposal
  • evidence that you have considered and addressed audience engagement and access associated with your artistic proposal.

Third Criterion | Timeliness

The panel will assess the timeliness of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • the proposal’s contribution and relevance to contemporary art discourse both in Australia and Internationally.

Successful EOI applicants will be asked to submit a detailed proposal later this year (Stage Two) based on the advice of a panel of independent industry advisors including national and international visual arts experts. The names of the panelists will be published when the successful Stage Two proposal is publicly announced.

The questions we will ask in the application form include:

  • a title for your proposal
  • the names of the proposed artist/s and curator/s
    *do not list names of any technicians, consultants or any other collaborator supporting your proposal.
  • a short overview of your proposal
  • attachment of three essential and one optional support material items will be required, including a two-page artistic proposal, biographies and curriculum vitae of all members of the artistic team and examples of previous work.

You must submit support material with your application. The panel will review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your proposal.

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact the Venice Biennale Project Team.

There are four types of support material you must submit:

  1. Artistic Proposal

A maximum two (2) page, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_ArtisticProposal_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should address the three assessment criteria outlined in these guidelines and provide a summary of your artistic proposal for the Australia Pavilion.

*You are not required to submit visuals or a realised exhibition concept in this EOI Stage One.

  1. Curriculum Vitae

A maximum one (1) page per individual, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_CV_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should include a short bio of each member, illustrate relevant experience and practice achievements of each member.

  1. Artistic support material

A maximum four (4) pages per artist, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_previouswork_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should include images and brief overview text of previous work. Do not include web links in this document.

  1. Letter of support from gallery (optional)

If you are affiliated with a commercial gallery, please provide a letter of support from them outlining the nature of their support towards your participation. An individual letter can be submitted for each artist forming part of the team.

If you are not affiliated with a commercial gallery, you do not need to submit this letter.

CINARS 2022 Biennale

Blood on the Dance Floor by Jacob Boehme. Credit: Dorine Blaise.

About the program

Established in 1984, taking place every two years, CINARS is one of the most important international showcases and networking events attracting over 1900 performing arts professionals from around the globe.

The Australia Council will support a delegation to attend this event. We also welcome any Australian artists and companies attending on a self-funded basis to join the delegation and any related networking activities.

More details on the event can be found on the CINARS website.

Funding

Australia Council will support 10 delegates with $4,000 each, towards the cost of travel. These supported delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the market including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation and registration.

Who can apply

  • This opportunity is for Australian-based artists and/or producers working independently or within organisations.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this grant if:

  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council.

Applicants are required to respond to the following assessment criteria:

  1. The impact of attendance at CINARS in developing future international opportunities and enhancing international visibility.
  2. Demonstrated understanding of and commitment to the region and market.
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any international outcomes that may arise.

Your application will be reviewed by Australia Council staff and industry advisers against the assessment criteria.

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by late September 2022.

No supporting material is required for this application.

Call for Digital Strategists

Request for proposal

in(ner) vision(s). Credit: Rémi Chauvin

About the opportunity

We are currently seeking proposals from digital strategists and creative technologists to consult with arts organisations on digital strategy and transformation.

The Digital Strategist-in-Residence program assigns consultants to eligible and selected organisations to increase the digital capacity and potential of the organisation, and to uncover new opportunities for transformation.

Consultants are required to provide advice, guidance, mentorship, and support to arts organisations in the development and advancement of their digital strategy and capabilities.

The goal of this residency program is to embed expert knowledge and skills within existing organisations to enable digital transformation and build digital capacity and strategic thinking. The program will provide a digital strategy and foundation for the organisation to continue, self-directed, on completion of the residency.

Find out more and submit your proposal.


Arts organisation should apply for the Digital Strategist-in-Residence program to be paired with a consultant.

Proposals will be reviewed against the following criteria:

  • Demonstrated knowledge and experience of organisational digital capability, strategy and transformation.
  • Demonstrated ability to deliver the project and achieve proposed outcomes required, including ability to facilitate within organisations.
  • Demonstrated knowledge and commitment to digital inclusion and accessibility, community engagement and cultural safety.
  • Demonstrated experience working with a diverse range of stakeholders, especially in the arts and creative industry.

We encourage applications from people who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability and people living in regional and remote areas.

We actively work with individuals to support access needs – including childcare, cultural practices, financial and/or learning access needs as required. We encourage applicants to contact us via phone or email to discuss this further.

Shortlisted applicants will be invited to an interview week commencing 15 August 2022. All applicants will be notified week commencing 22 August 2022.

Frequently asked questions

Over a three month period, the program is delivered in three phases. Your organisation will work with the strategist to complete the following:

  • Assess: the strategist will take the organisation through the Digital Culture Compass, an online tool that will help identify the organisation’s current level of digital maturity.
  • Develop: a process of ideation and investigation to identify digital challenges and opportunities for your organisation. This phase involves feasibility research to refine and resolve potential initiatives.
  • Draft: collate your work into a digital strategy (and/or implementation plan) document that aligns with your existing strategic/business plan.

Our digital strategists are a diverse group of creative technologists and digital consultants with a broad range of experience across digital technologies, capacities and roles. Strategists will be located across Australia and are selected based on their:

  • experience with digital transformation
  • knowledge of the arts and creative industry
  • commitment to digital inclusion, cultural competency and accessibility.

Organisations will be matched with strategists based on the individual needs and priority areas.

This residency is designed to be delivered online with potential for hybrid delivery, involving a combination of in-person and online sessions with your strategist via negotiation.

Proposal documents should include the following:

  • A written response outlining how the individual, company or organisation proposes to meet the requirement of the project (no more than two pages).
  • A breakdown of your quote, including availability and capacity to deliver the requirements within the budget requirements of this document (refer part B6). Your quote must include and note GST where applicable.
  • Individual, company or organisation information such as corporate status, registered place of business, size, number of staff and insurance policies.
  • Qualifications of the staff to be designated to the project.
  • Two referees to whom the Australia Council may address enquiries concerning previous experience in this area.
  • A declaration of any partial or non-compliance with any provisions of this RFP. This includes not agreeing to any of the draft conditions of contract stating reasons and alternatives where appropriate.

Victorian Circus and Physical Theatre Projects for Individuals and Groups

Announcement

Recipients of this opportunity have been announced. The full list can be found on the awarded grants page.

About the program

This program is designed to specifically support the circus and physical theatre sector in Victoria. It provides investment into artist and artform development, projects and activities to support skills development, employment, market development and artistic outcomes. This program supports circus and physical theatre practice; it does not extend to dance or dance-theatre.

Victorian applicants may apply for activity to take place in Victoria, nationally and internationally.

Applicants from outside of Victoria may apply for activity in Victoria if the proposed activity is in partnership with Victorian individuals, groups or organisations and the applicant can demonstrate impact for the Victorian circus and physical theatre sector.

Individuals and groups can propose a single project; a series of projects; or a suite of activities over a fixed period of time.

This Investment is offered following changes to the circus and physical theatre landscape in Victoria during 2021. The Australia Council and Creative Victoria are jointly managing strategic investments to support the circus and physical theatre sector, guided by the principles of the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework.

Grants are available from $10,000 to $80,000. Supported activities must last no longer than two years from the proposed start date.

Please note: Your project must consider the latest government advice regarding COVID-19.

Please read through the following grant guidelines.

If you need advice about applying, contact an Artists Services Officer now.

Who can apply

  • Only individuals and groups may apply to this category.
  • Australian citizens or Australian permanent residents and a practicing artist or arts professional.

The proposed activity must support the circus and physical theatre sector in Victoria

 

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this grant if:

  • you are an organisation
  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council

What can be applied for

We will fund a range of activities which support and build capacity in the circus and physical theatre sector in Victoria, for example:

  • professional skills development, including mentoring and residencies. This may include a suite of activity over a fixed period of time.
  • the creation of new work
  • practice based research
  • creative development
  • experimentation
  • collaborations
  • touring
  • festivals
  • productions
  • exhibitions
  • performances
  • publishing
  • recording
  • promotion and marketing
  • market development activity
  • activities that creatively engage communities.

Access costs are legitimate expenses and may be included in your application. We encourage applicants to ensure that their work is accessible to everyone. Therefore, budgets may also include costs associated with making activities accessible to a wide range of people (e.g. performances using Auslan, translation to other languages, captioning, audio description, temporary building adjustments, and materials in other formats).

If you are an applicant with a disability, or are working with artists with disability, you may apply for access costs associated with the use of an interpreter, translation services, specific technical equipment, carer, or support worker assistance. Please contact Artists Services to discuss your specific needs.

What can’t be applied for

You can’t apply for:

  • projects or activities that do not involve or benefit the Victorian circus and physical theatre sector
  • projects or activities that do not have a clearly defined arts component
  • projects that have already taken place
  • activities engaging with First Nations content, artists and communities that do not adhere to the Australia Council First Nations Cultural & Intellectual Property Protocols.

Your application must comply with the following Protocols. We may contact you to request further information during the assessment process, or if successful, as a condition of your funding.

Protocols for using First Nations Cultural and Intellectual Property in the Arts

All applications involving First Nations artists, communities or subject matter must adhere to these Protocols, provide evidence of this in their application and support material. More information on the First Nations Protocols is available here.

Commonwealth Child Safe Framework

All successful applicants are required to comply with all Australian law relating to employing or engaging people who work or volunteer with children, including working with children checks and mandatory reporting. Successful organisations who provide services directly to children, or whose funded activities involve contact with children, will additionally be required to implement the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations.

Your application will be assessed by a panel of artists and arts workers with expertise in the Australian circus and physical theatre sector.

You must address three assessment criteria in this category.  

Under each criterion are bullet points indicating what peers may consider when assessing your application. You do not need to respond to every bullet point listed. 

First criterion 

Quality 

  • Peers will assess the quality of the artistic and cultural activities at the centre of your proposal. They may consider: 
  • vision, ideas and artistic rationale 
  • benefit and impact on career, artistic and cultural practice 
  • level of innovation, ambition, experimentation or risk-taking 
  • rigour and clear articulation of creative, engagement or development processes 
  • significance of the work within the relevant area of practice and/or community 
  • contribution to diverse cultural expression 
  • timeliness and relevance of work 
  • quality of previous work 
  • responses to previous work from artistic or cultural peers, or the public. 

Second criterion 

Viability 

Peers will assess the viability of your proposal. They may consider: 

  • relevance and timeliness of proposed activity 
  • skills and ability of artists, arts professionals, collaborators, or partners involved, and relevance to activity 
  • realistic and achievable planning and resource use, including contingency and COVID-safe plans for activities involving public presentations, national or international travel 
  • appropriate payments to participating artists, arts professionals, collaborators, participants, or cultural consultants 
  • the safety and wellbeing of people involved in the project 
  • role of partners or collaborators, including confirmation of involvement 
  • the diversity and scale of income and co-funding, including earned income, grants, sponsorship, and in-kind contributions 
  • where relevant to the project, evidence that the Protocols for using First Nations Cultural and Intellectual Property in the Arts have been adhered to 
  • evidence of appropriate consultation with participants, audiences, or communities 
  • where relevant, evidence that you have considered and addressed any access issues associated with your project 
  • where relevant, evidence that you have addressed the environmental impact of your project. 

Third criterion 

Impact 

The peers will assess how your activity contributes towards building a sustainable and diverse Victorian circus and physical theatre sector. They may consider how your activity: 

  • contributes to increasing diversity (including First Nations, disability, gender, LGBTIQ+, age and cultural diversity) within the circus and physical theatre sector in reference to artists, key creatives, programming and audiences. 
  • contributes to artform development through the commissioning, development and/or presentation of new Australian work that reflects contemporary Australia  
  • contributes to building capacity in the circus and physical theatre sector 
  • demonstrates collaboration and/or leadership on key sector issues.

You should submit support material with your application. The peer assessors may review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your project.

What you should provide

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online, or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact Artists Services.

There are three types of support material you may submit:

  1. Artistic support material

This should include relevant, recent examples of your artistic or cultural work, or the services you provide.

Types of support material we accept

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs (weblinks).

You can provide up to three URLs (weblinks) that link to content that is relevant to your proposal. This may include video, audio, images, or written material.

These URLs can include a total of:

  • 10 minutes of video and/or audio recording
  • 10 images
  • 10 pages of written material (for example, excerpts of literary writing).

Please note: Our peer assessors will not access any URLs that require them to log in or sign up to a platform. Please do not provide links to Spotify or other applications that require users to log in or pay for access.

If you are linking to media files that are private or password protected like Vimeo, please provide the password in the password field on the application form.

Other accepted file formats

If you cannot supply support material via URLs, you may upload support material to your application in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  1. Biographies and CVs

You can include a brief bio or curriculum vitae (CV) for key artists, personnel or other collaborators involved in your project.

Brief bios or CV information should be presented as a single document no longer than two A4 pages in total.

  1. Letters of support

Individuals, groups or organisations can write letters in support of your project. A support letter should explain how the project or activity will benefit you, other artists or arts professionals, participants or the broader community. It can also detail the support or involvement of key project partners, or evidence of consultation.

If relevant to your activity, letters of support must provide evidence of appropriate permissions and support from First Nations organisations, communities, and Elders. Please refer to the First Nations Protocols for more information.

You can include up to five letters of support, with each letter not exceeding one A4 page.

Frequently asked questions

You will receive your grant payment within two weeks of accepting your funding agreement. Please note we pay our grants in the financial year which they are approved. We will not adjust payment timelines to the particular circumstances of individuals. 

The deadline for applications is at 3:00pm AET on the closing date. We strongly recommend submitting before this. Administrative and technical support is only available during office hours (Monday-Friday) 9am to 5 pm AET. Late applications will not be accepted. 

Yes, if you have support materials such as letters from project partners, collaborators or participants that are in languages other than English (including Auslan), we can arrange translation or captioning. 

Please contact the Artists Services team at least four weeks before the closing date of the grant round to which you are intending to make an application. If you do not contact us at least four weeks before the closing date, we may not have sufficient time to meet your translation needs. 

Our online application form also has a checkbox at the top which you can tick if you have attached materials in a language other than English. This alerts the Artists Services team that you have submitted these materials. 

We do not accept applications submitted via post. Any material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your application online, please contact Artists Services. 

We do not amend, correct, update or change any part of your application once it has been submitted. However, if you receive additional confirmations for activities or artists after the closing date you may alert us to these, and we may bring them to the attention of peer assessors at the assessment meeting. These updates could include confirmation that a proposed activity will take place, a partnership has been secured, or funding from another source has been received. 

You can update us about such confirmations by contacting us. Briefly describe the nature of the confirmation and cite your application reference number.  You do not need to send us copies of confirmation emails from third parties – if we need to see evidence of the confirmation we will request it. 

If you wish to update your application once it has been submitted, but the closing date has not yet passed, you can submit a new, updated application and request to withdraw the original one by emailing operationsservicedesk@creative.gov.au 

Grant applications can be found and are submitted through our online system. If you are using the system for the first time you will need to register your details before filling out a grant application form. 

When will I be notified about the outcome of my application? 

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application approximately 12 weeks after the closing date. Please see the guidelines page for the grant category you are interested in for more details. 

Yes, however you must be the applicant. Contact us to discuss your proposal prior to submitting your application.

To apply for this category your project must be circus or physical theatre activity or proposing to support the Victorian circus and physical theatre sector.

This program supports circus and physical theatre practice, it does not extend to dance or dance-theatre. 

Following changes to the circus and physical theatre landscape in Victoria during 2021, the Australia Council for the Arts and Creative Victoria are jointly managing new investments to support the circus and physical theatre sector, guided by the principles of the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework. 

We define a ‘group’ as two or more individuals who do not form a legally constituted organisation.  This can include co-collaborators and collectives.  Groups are not eligible to apply to programs open only to organisations. 

An ‘organisation’ is a legally constituted organisation that is registered or created by law. For example, incorporated associations, companies limited by guarantee or government statutory authorities are all defined as organisations. Organisations that are not legally constituted are not eligible to apply for funding in grant categories that are open to organisations only. Organisations may be required to provide a certificate of incorporation or evidence of their current legal status.  Funding programs for organisations are not intended for sole traders or partnerships. 

No. 

Yes. However, the contact person for group applications must be an Australian citizen or permanent resident. 

We provide funding to practising artists or artsworkers. While you may not regularly earn income from your practice, you must be identified and recognised by your peers as a practising artist or artsworker. This may include cultural practitioners, editors, producers, curators and arts managers. 

No. If you have an overdue grant acquittal you will not be eligible to apply for any further grants. 

No. Only Australian citizens and Australian permanent residents may apply to the Australia Council for funding. Foreign nationals who are permitted to live and work in Australia by holding visas such as a Special Category visa or a Bridging visa are not eligible to apply. 

Yes. Creative research and development is a key component of the creative process and can be funded through this category.

Yes. We accept applications in languages other than English, including Auslan. 

If any part of your application requires translation into English, please contact the Artists Services team at least four weeks before the closing date of the round to which you intend to apply. We will use our best and all reasonable endeavours to assist in having some or all of the material translated. However we reserve the right to refuse an application in a language other than English if we believe there is no genuine reason to accept such an application, or if the time-frame for translation precludes us from making the materials available for assessment in the round to which it was submitted.

If you wish to request an application form in a language other than English, please contact the Artists Services team at least 12 weeks before the closing date of the round to which you intend to apply.

We reserve the right to refuse an application form translation request if we believe there is no genuine reason for the request. We also reserve the right to refuse an application form translation if the time-frame for translation prevents us from providing a translated form in time for assessment in the round to which it was submitted. 

Where you have supplied creative content in a language other than English, we may engage an industry expert to provide the peers with an evaluation of the artistic merit of that creative content. 

You can speak with staff at the Australia Council in your first language. Please telephone the Translating and Interpreting Service on 131 450 (local call anywhere in Australia) and ask to be connected with the Australia Council. 

Applications that focus solely on academic studies, or are for activities that are part of assessable coursework are unlikely to be successful with our assessment panels. Assessment panels are also unlikely to support applications requesting the costs of academic fees or courses. 

If you wish to apply for study costs, explain to the panel how your project extends, or supplements, the course’s standard curriculum requirements. Also, bear in mind that your project will be assessed on artistic merit of the work. 

If you are applying for funding to complete a training program, course, workshop or diploma, explain how doing so will impact positively on your career or practice. 

Do you fund feature film, television or documentary? 

While we can support screen-based art, we do not generally support activities associated with feature film, television or documentary. See Screen Australia, the Federal Government’s primary agency for production of Australian screen activity. https://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/  

No, we do not offer quick response grants. Outside of our regular grants program, we do offer a number of other grants and opportunities. 

Yes. Early career artists are eligible to apply for funding through this category.  

Yes. Individuals and Groups can propose a program of projects and/or activities. This could be a series of projects; or a suite of activities over a fixed period of time.

We encourage applicants to be mindful of the following considerations: 

The activities should each contribute toward a clear, unifying overall objective –  for example,  the development of an individuals or group’s artistic practice. The suite of activity could include creative development or presentation alongside professional development opportunities. It is important to demonstrate the rationale for the inclusion of these activities and how the overall program or suite of activity will align with the individuals or group’s artistic practice and ambition.

In proposing a program consisting of multiple projects or activities, it is possible that some individual projects may be less compelling than others. If you are submitting an application proposing multiple activities or projects, we encourage you to ensure that a similar level of consideration, planning, and artistic merit is common to each to avoid one component of your program potentially letting down the others. 

You may wish to consider using one of the 3 URLs you can provide as support material to link to a document that provides more detail about each individual project or activity in your program. 

As a national arts funding body, all Australia Council grant rounds are competitive. Success rates are usually between 15% and 20%. Success rate for this category may be higher depending on demand.

Yes. Projects must have a start date that falls after we notify you of the outcome of your application, and no later than one year from that date. We will notify you of the outcome of your application approximately 12 weeks after the closing date. 

No. However, applications involving venues and partners are likely to be more competitive if their involvement is confirmed. 

Australia Council staff are available to assist you in understanding the purpose of the grant, application requirements, and submitting your application. Staff can assist over email, phone and using Skype. We cannot review application drafts. 

Additional support can be discussed where needed. Where the additional support required is beyond the scope of what our staff can provide, we may recommend speaking to an appropriate organisation for further assistance. 

The best applications are those where the voice of the artist comes through. Where possible you, ‘the artist’, should write your application. Your manager may administer the grant on your behalf to undertake the financial and reporting requirements. 

If you are applying as an unincorporated entity, unincorporated association or partnership you do not need to have an administrator for your grant. However, you must be able to provide an ABN and bank account that are in the group’s name. If you cannot do this you must nominate an administrator. For more information about this, please contact us. 

All individual or organisation grant applicants based in Australia must have an active Australian Business Number (ABN). Individual applicants without an ABN may have their grant administered by an individual or organisation with an ABN. Organisations operating outside of Australia do not need an ABN to apply. Individuals based outside of Australia may not need an ABN to apply, depending on their circumstances (please check with your accountant or tax advisor). 

Furthermore, the name of the applicant must match the name of the ABN and the name of the bank account into which we pay the funds. There are no exceptions to this rule. If you cannot provide an ABN and bank account that are in the same name as the applicant, you will need to nominate an administrator for your grant. 

For more information about this, please contact us.

Grants can be considered income by Centrelink. The amount is generally assessed as a lump sum and could affect your Centrelink payment for the financial year. Artists who are running a business (even on a small scale) may have their grant treated differently. It is possible to have your grant paid to an administering body if you wish. 

Applicants should contact Centrelink on 13 28 50 for advice. Additionally, Centrelink’s Financial Information Service (FIS) is an education and information service available to everyone in the community and may be of benefit to applicants who also receive assistance through the social security system. To contact FIS phone 13 23 00. 

Yes.  The Australia Council expects that artists professionally employed or engaged on Australia Council-funded activities will be remunerated for their work in line with industry standards. Payment of artist fees should be reflected in your application budget. 

For more information, see our Payment of Artists page. 

Our grants program is primarily designed to support projects that have a defined start and end date, rather than ongoing organisational administration costs. Project budgets that include a high proportion of administration costs may be less competitive. However, if you do need funding to cover administration costs directly related to the delivery of your project, you can include them in your grant request. 

Grants paid by the Australia Council may be considered part of your income in a financial year and may be subject to tax. You must determine your own taxation liabilities. We suggest you consult your financial adviser or contact the Australian Taxation Office on 13 28 66. 

No. The Australia Council encourages applicants whose projects will take place in regional and remote locations to budget accurately and realistically, as it is recognised that costs may differ between regions and major cities. 

If you are GST-registered when you receive an Australia Council grant, the Australia Council will pay the grant amount plus GST. The budget provided in your application should be exclusive of GST. 

Yes. The Australia Council recognises that funding may be required for access costs incurred by applicants with disability, or for costs associated with working with artists with disability – who may have particular access needs (e.g. use of an interpreter, translation services, specific technical equipment, support worker/carer assistance). Access costs are viewed as legitimate expenses and may be included in an applicant’s budget. The Australia Council encourages applicants to ensure that their work is accessible to everyone. Therefore, budgets may also include costs associated with making activities accessible to a wide range of people (e.g. performances using Auslan, captioning, audio description, temporary building adjustments, materials in other formats such as Braille or CD). 

The application form calculates your grant request as the difference between your total cash income, and your total cash costs. The gap between these two numbers is the grant request. In-kind contributions are not included in this calculation. 

Total cash costs – total cash income = grant request 

For example – 

$50,000 cash costs – $30,000 cash income = $20,000 Australia Council grant request. 

Yes. The Australia Council recognises that childcare needs may impede access to employment in the arts. Accordingly, childcare is a legitimate expense to include in an applicant’s budget. 

We encourage our applicants to seek funding from other sources to cover the complete costs of their projects. While it does depend on the size of your grant request to us, we would expect that applicants with large grant requests would also secure funding from elsewhere to cover all costs associated with a large-scale project. 

Yes. Out-of-pocket expenses such as telephone calls or petrol for travel, are recognised as legitimate expenses and may be included in an applicant’s budget. 

Yes. In-kind support refers to resources, goods and services (for example, use of a venue, materials, and/or people’s time) provided by yourself or others either free of charge, or below market value. Detailing in-kind costs in the budget is important as it gives peers a full understanding of the viability of your project and levels of support you are receiving. In-kind costs are also an expense so, when you save your application, any in-kind income you included will auto-populate to the expenses side of the budget. 

Victorian Circus and Physical Theatre Projects for Organisations

Announcement

Recipients of this opportunity have been announced. The full list can be found on the awarded grants page.

About the program

This program is designed to specifically support the circus and physical theatre sector in Victoria. It provides investment into artist and artform development, projects and activities to support skills development, employment, market development and artistic outcomes.

This program supports circus and physical theatre practice, it does not extend to dance or dance-theatre.

Victorian applicants may apply for activity in Victoria, nationally and internationally.

Applicants from outside of Victoria may apply for activity in Victoria if the proposed activity is in partnership with a Victorian organisation and the applicant can demonstrate impact for the Victorian circus and physical theatre sector.

Organisations that undertake arts programs, projects or that provide services to artists are welcome to apply. Organisations can propose a single project, a suite of projects or annual programs of activity.

Applicants do not need to be a specialist circus or physical theatre organisation however the application must propose circus or physical theatre activity or capacity building for this sector.

This Investment is offered following changes to the circus and physical theatre landscape in Victoria during 2021. The Australia Council and Creative Victoria are jointly managing strategic investments to support the circus and physical theatre sector, guided by the principles of the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework.

Grants are available from $20,000 to $150,000. Supported activities must last no longer than two years from the proposed start date.

Please note: Your project must consider the latest government advice regarding COVID-19.

Please read through the following grant guidelines.

If you need advice about applying, contact an Artists Services Officer now.

Who can apply

  • Only organisations may apply to this category.
  • The proposed activity must support the circus and physical theatre sector in Victoria

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this grant if:

  • your organisation receives $600,000 or more per year in Multi-Year Investment from the Australia Council
  • you are an international organisation
  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • you are an individual or group

What can be applied for

We will fund a range of activities which support and build capacity in the circus and physical theatre sector in Victoria, for example:

  • professional skills development, including mentoring and residencies
  • the creation of new work
  • practice based research
  • creative development
  • experimentation
  • collaborations
  • touring
  • festivals
  • productions
  • exhibitions
  • performances
  • publishing
  • recording
  • activities to develop the arts sector
  • promotion and marketing
  • market development activity
  • activities that creatively engage communities.

Access costs are legitimate expenses and may be included in your application. We encourage applicants to ensure that their work is accessible to everyone. Therefore, budgets may also include costs associated with making activities accessible to a wide range of people (e.g. performances using Auslan, translation to other languages, captioning, audio description, temporary building adjustments, and materials in other formats).

If you are an applicant with a disability, or are working with artists with disability, you may apply for access costs associated with the use of an interpreter, translation services, specific technical equipment, carer or support worker assistance. Please contact Artists Services to discuss your specific needs.

What can’t be applied for

  • projects or activities that do not involve or benefit the Victorian circus and physical theatre sector.
  • projects or activities that do not have a clearly defined arts component
  • projects that have already taken place
  • activities engaging with First Nations content, artists and communities that do not adhere to the Australia Council First Nations Cultural & Intellectual Property Protocols.

Your application must comply with the following Protocols. We may contact you to request further information during the assessment process, or if successful, as a condition of your funding.

Protocols for using First Nations Cultural and Intellectual Property in the Arts 

All applications involving First Nations artists, communities or subject matter must adhere to these Protocols, provide evidence of this in their application and support material. More information on the First Nations Protocols is available here.

Commonwealth Child Safe Framework 

All successful applicants are required to comply with all Australian law relating to employing or engaging people who work or volunteer with children, including working with children checks and mandatory reporting. Successful organisations who provide services directly to children, or whose funded activities involve contact with children, will additionally be required to implement the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations.

Your application will be peer assessed by a panel of artists and arts workers with expertise in the Australian circus and physical theatre sector.

You must address three assessment criteria in this category.

Under each criterion are bullet points indicating what peers may consider when assessing your application. You do not need to respond to every bullet point listed.

First criterion 

Quality of artistic activity or services to artists 

Peers will assess the quality of the artistic and cultural activities at the centre of your proposal. They may consider:

  • vision, ideas and artistic rational
  • benefit and impact on careers, artistic or cultural practice
  • level of innovation, ambition, experimentation or risk-taking
  • rigour and clear articulation of creative, engagement or development processes
  • significance of the work within area of practice and communities
  • contribution to diverse cultural expression
  • relevance of work
  • quality of previous work
  • responses to previous work from artistic or cultural peers, or the public.

Second criterion 

Viability

Peers will assess the viability of your proposal.

They may consider:

  • capacity to deliver the proposed activities or services
  • timeliness of proposed activity
  • skills and ability of artists, arts professionals, collaborators, or participants involved, and relevance to activity
  • realistic and achievable planning and resource use, including contingency and COVID-safe plans for activities involving public presentation, national or international travel
  • meaningful evaluation
  • appropriate payments to participating artists, arts professionals, collaborators, participants, or cultural consultants
  • the safety and wellbeing of people involved in the project
  • governance arrangements
  • role of partners or collaborators, including confirmation of involvement
  • diversity and scale of income and co-funding, including earned income, grants, sponsorship and in-kind contributions
  • where relevant to the project, evidence that the Protocols for First Nations Cultural and Intellectual Property in the Arts have been adhered to
  • evidence of appropriate consultation and engagement with participants, audiences or communities
  • Where relevant, evidence that you have considered and addressed any access issues associated with your project
  • Where relevant, evidence that you have addressed the environmental impact of your project.

Third criterion 

Impact

Peers will assess how your activity contributes towards building a sustainable and diverse Victorian circus and physical theatre sector.

They may consider how your activity:

  • contributes to increasing diversity (including First Nations, disability, gender, LGBTIQ+, age and cultural diversity) within the circus and physical theatre sector in reference to artists, key creatives, programming and audiences
  • contributes to artform development through the commissioning, development and/or presentation of new Australian work that reflects contemporary Australia
  • contributes to building capacity in the circus and physical theatre sector
  • demonstrates collaboration and/or leadership on key sector issues

You should submit support material with your application. The peer assessors may review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your project.

What you should provide

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online, or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact Artists Services.

There are three types of support material you may submit:

  1. Artistic support material

This should include relevant, recent examples of your artistic or cultural work, or the services you provide.

Types of support material we accept

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs (weblinks).

You can provide up to three URLs (weblinks) that link to content that is relevant to your proposal. This may include video, audio, images, or written material.

These URLs can include a total of:

  • 10 minutes of video and/or audio recording
  • 10 images
  • 10 pages of written material (for example, excerpts of literary writing).

Please note: Our peer assessors will not access any URLs that require them to log in or sign up to a platform. Please do not provide links to Spotify or other applications that require users to log in or pay for access.

If you are linking to media files that are private or password protected like Vimeo, please provide the password in the password field on the application form.

Other accepted file formats

If you cannot supply support material via URLs, you may upload support material to your application in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  1. Biographies and CVs

You can include a brief bio or curriculum vitae (CV) for key artists, personnel or other collaborators involved in your project.

Brief bios or CV information should be presented as a single document no longer than two A4 pages in total.

  1. Letters of support

Individuals, groups or organisations can write letters in support of your project. A support letter should explain how the project or activity will benefit you, other artists or arts professionals, participants or the broader community.  It can also detail the support or involvement of key project partners, or evidence of consultation.

If relevant to your activity, letters of support must provide evidence of appropriate permissions and support from First Nations organisations, communities, and Elders. Please refer to the First Nations Protocols for more information.

You can include up to five letters of support, with each letter not exceeding one A4 page.

Frequently asked questions

You will receive your grant payment within two weeks of accepting your funding agreement. Please note we pay our grants in the financial year which they are approved. We will not adjust payment timelines to the particular circumstances of individuals. 

The deadline for applications is at 3:00pm AET on the closing date. We strongly recommend submitting before this. Administrative and technical support is only available during office hours (Monday-Friday) 9am to 5 pm AET. Late applications will not be accepted. 

Yes, if you have support materials such as letters from project partners, collaborators or participants that are in languages other than English (including Auslan), we can arrange translation or captioning. 

Please contact the Artists Services team at least four weeks before the closing date of the grant round to which you are intending to make an application. If you do not contact us at least four weeks before the closing date, we may not have sufficient time to meet your translation needs. 

Our online application form also has a checkbox at the top which you can tick if you have attached materials in a language other than English. This alerts the Artists Services team that you have submitted these materials. 

We do not accept applications submitted via post. Any material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your application online, please contact Artists Services. 

We do not amend, correct, update or change any part of your application once it has been submitted. However, if you receive additional confirmations for activities or artists after the closing date you may alert us to these, and we may bring them to the attention of peer assessors at the assessment meeting. These updates could include confirmation that a proposed activity will take place, a partnership has been secured, or funding from another source has been received. 

You can update us about such confirmations by contacting us. Briefly describe the nature of the confirmation and cite your application reference number.  You do not need to send us copies of confirmation emails from third parties – if we need to see evidence of the confirmation we will request it. 

If you wish to update your application once it has been submitted, but the closing date has not yet passed, you can submit a new, updated application and request to withdraw the original one by emailing operationsservicedesk@creative.gov.au 

Grant applications can be found and are submitted through our online system. If you are using the system for the first time you will need to register your details before filling out a grant application form. 

When will I be notified about the outcome of my application? 

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application approximately 12 weeks after the closing date. Please see the guidelines page for the grant category you are interested in for more details. 

Yes, however you must be the applicant. Contact us to discuss your proposal prior to submitting your application.

To apply for this category your project must be circus or physical theatre activity or proposing to support the Victorian circus and physical theatre sector.

This program supports circus and physical theatre practice, it does not extend to dance or dance-theatre. 

Following changes to the circus and physical theatre landscape in Victoria during 2021, the Australia Council for the Arts and Creative Victoria are jointly managing new investments to support the circus and physical theatre sector, guided by the principles of the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework. 

We define a ‘group’ as two or more individuals who do not form a legally constituted organisation.  This can include co-collaborators and collectives.  Groups are not eligible to apply to programs open only to organisations. 

An ‘organisation’ is a legally constituted organisation that is registered or created by law. For example, incorporated associations, companies limited by guarantee or government statutory authorities are all defined as organisations. Organisations that are not legally constituted are not eligible to apply for funding in grant categories that are open to organisations only. Organisations may be required to provide a certificate of incorporation or evidence of their current legal status.  Funding programs for organisations are not intended for sole traders or partnerships. 

No. 

Yes. However, the contact person for group applications must be an Australian citizen or permanent resident. 

No, international organisations are not eligible to apply for this category.

We provide funding to practising artists or artsworkers. While you may not regularly earn income from your practice, you must be identified and recognised by your peers as a practising artist or artsworker. This may include cultural practitioners, editors, producers, curators and arts managers. 

No. If you have an overdue grant acquittal you will not be eligible to apply for any further grants. 

No. Only Australian citizens and Australian permanent residents may apply to the Australia Council for funding. Foreign nationals who are permitted to live and work in Australia by holding visas such as a Special Category visa or a Bridging visa are not eligible to apply. 

Yes. Creative research and development is a key component of the creative process and can be funded through this category.

Yes. We accept applications in languages other than English, including Auslan. 

If any part of your application requires translation into English, please contact the Artists Services team at least four weeks before the closing date of the round to which you intend to apply. We will use our best and all reasonable endeavours to assist in having some or all of the material translated. However we reserve the right to refuse an application in a language other than English if we believe there is no genuine reason to accept such an application, or if the time-frame for translation precludes us from making the materials available for assessment in the round to which it was submitted.

If you wish to request an application form in a language other than English, please contact the Artists Services team at least 12 weeks before the closing date of the round to which you intend to apply.

We reserve the right to refuse an application form translation request if we believe there is no genuine reason for the request. We also reserve the right to refuse an application form translation if the time-frame for translation prevents us from providing a translated form in time for assessment in the round to which it was submitted. 

Where you have supplied creative content in a language other than English, we may engage an industry expert to provide the peers with an evaluation of the artistic merit of that creative content. 

You can speak with staff at the Australia Council in your first language. Please telephone the Translating and Interpreting Service on 131 450 (local call anywhere in Australia) and ask to be connected with the Australia Council. 

Applications that focus solely on academic studies, or are for activities that are part of assessable coursework are unlikely to be successful with our assessment panels. Assessment panels are also unlikely to support applications requesting the costs of academic fees or courses. 

If you wish to apply for study costs, explain to the panel how your project extends, or supplements, the course’s standard curriculum requirements. Also, bear in mind that your project will be assessed on artistic merit of the work. 

If you are applying for funding to complete a training program, course, workshop or diploma, explain how doing so will impact positively on your career or practice. 

Do you fund feature film, television or documentary? 

While we can support screen-based art, we do not generally support activities associated with feature film, television or documentary. See Screen Australia, the Federal Government’s primary agency for production of Australian screen activity. https://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/  

No, we do not offer quick response grants. Outside of our regular grants program, we do offer a number of other grants and opportunities. 

Yes. Early career artists are eligible to apply for funding through this category.  

Yes. Organisations can propose a program of projects and/or activities. This could be an organisation’s full artistic program for a given calendar year, for example.

We encourage applicants to be mindful of the following considerations: 

The activities should each contribute toward a clear, unifying overall objective –  for example,  the organisation’s artistic vision. It is important to demonstrate the rationale for the inclusion of these activities and how the overall program will align with the organisation’s vision.

In proposing a program consisting of multiple projects or activities, it is possible that some individual projects may be less compelling than others. If you are submitting an application proposing multiple activities or projects, we encourage you to ensure that a similar level of consideration, planning, and artistic merit is common to each to avoid one component of your program potentially letting down the others. 

You may wish to consider using one of the 3 URLs you can provide as support material to link to a document that provides more detail about each individual project or activity in your program. 

As a national arts funding body, all Australia Council grant rounds are competitive. Success rates are usually between 15% and 20%. Success rate for this category may be higher depending on demand.

Yes. Projects must have a start date that falls after we notify you of the outcome of your application, and no later than one year from that date. We will notify you of the outcome of your application approximately 12 weeks after the closing date. 

No. However, applications involving venues and partners are likely to be more competitive if their involvement is confirmed. 

Australia Council staff are available to assist you in understanding the purpose of the grant, application requirements, and submitting your application. Staff can assist over email, phone and using Skype. We cannot review application drafts. 

Additional support can be discussed where needed. Where the additional support required is beyond the scope of what our staff can provide, we may recommend speaking to an appropriate organisation for further assistance. 

The best applications are those where the voice of the artist comes through. Where possible you, ‘the artist’, should write your application. Your manager may administer the grant on your behalf to undertake the financial and reporting requirements. 

If you are applying as an unincorporated entity, unincorporated association or partnership you do not need to have an administrator for your grant. However, you must be able to provide an ABN and bank account that are in the group’s name. If you cannot do this you must nominate an administrator. For more information about this, please contact us. 

All individual or organisation grant applicants based in Australia must have an active Australian Business Number (ABN). Individual applicants without an ABN may have their grant administered by an individual or organisation with an ABN. Organisations operating outside of Australia do not need an ABN to apply. Individuals based outside of Australia may not need an ABN to apply, depending on their circumstances (please check with your accountant or tax advisor). 

Furthermore, the name of the applicant must match the name of the ABN and the name of the bank account into which we pay the funds. There are no exceptions to this rule. If you cannot provide an ABN and bank account that are in the same name as the applicant, you will need to nominate an administrator for your grant. 

For more information about this, please contact us.

Grants can be considered income by Centrelink. The amount is generally assessed as a lump sum and could affect your Centrelink payment for the financial year. Artists who are running a business (even on a small scale) may have their grant treated differently. It is possible to have your grant paid to an administering body if you wish. 

Applicants should contact Centrelink on 13 28 50 for advice. Additionally, Centrelink’s Financial Information Service (FIS) is an education and information service available to everyone in the community and may be of benefit to applicants who also receive assistance through the social security system. To contact FIS phone 13 23 00. 

Yes.  The Australia Council expects that artists professionally employed or engaged on Australia Council-funded activities will be remunerated for their work in line with industry standards. Payment of artist fees should be reflected in your application budget. 

For more information, see our Payment of Artists page. 

Our grants program is primarily designed to support projects that have a defined start and end date, rather than ongoing organisational administration costs. Project budgets that include a high proportion of administration costs may be less competitive. However, if you do need funding to cover administration costs directly related to the delivery of your project, you can include them in your grant request. 

Grants paid by the Australia Council may be considered part of your income in a financial year and may be subject to tax. You must determine your own taxation liabilities. We suggest you consult your financial adviser or contact the Australian Taxation Office on 13 28 66. 

No. The Australia Council encourages applicants whose projects will take place in regional and remote locations to budget accurately and realistically, as it is recognised that costs may differ between regions and major cities. 

If you are GST-registered when you receive an Australia Council grant, the Australia Council will pay the grant amount plus GST. The budget provided in your application should be exclusive of GST. 

Yes. The Australia Council recognises that funding may be required for access costs incurred by applicants with disability, or for costs associated with working with artists with disability – who may have particular access needs (e.g. use of an interpreter, translation services, specific technical equipment, support worker/carer assistance). Access costs are viewed as legitimate expenses and may be included in an applicant’s budget. The Australia Council encourages applicants to ensure that their work is accessible to everyone. Therefore, budgets may also include costs associated with making activities accessible to a wide range of people (e.g. performances using Auslan, captioning, audio description, temporary building adjustments, materials in other formats such as Braille or CD). 

The application form calculates your grant request as the difference between your total cash income, and your total cash costs. The gap between these two numbers is the grant request. In-kind contributions are not included in this calculation. 

Total cash costs – total cash income = grant request 

For example – 

$50,000 cash costs – $30,000 cash income = $20,000 Australia Council grant request. 

Yes. The Australia Council recognises that childcare needs may impede access to employment in the arts. Accordingly, childcare is a legitimate expense to include in an applicant’s budget. 

We encourage our applicants to seek funding from other sources to cover the complete costs of their projects. While it does depend on the size of your grant request to us, we would expect that applicants with large grant requests would also secure funding from elsewhere to cover all costs associated with a large-scale project. 

Yes. Out-of-pocket expenses such as telephone calls or petrol for travel, are recognised as legitimate expenses and may be included in an applicant’s budget. 

Yes. In-kind support refers to resources, goods and services (for example, use of a venue, materials, and/or people’s time) provided by yourself or others either free of charge, or below market value. Detailing in-kind costs in the budget is important as it gives peers a full understanding of the viability of your project and levels of support you are receiving. In-kind costs are also an expense so, when you save your application, any in-kind income you included will auto-populate to the expenses side of the budget.